Fix: Postfix File too big error

Valic —  March 13, 2013 — 1 Comment

I was looking in my server logs and I’ve found an error from my Postfix Mail Server. That appeared when I wanted to send a 10MB backup trough mail. The error was found in /var/log/mail.err file and looks like this:

postfix/postdrop[197353]: warning: uid=0: File too large
postfix/sendmail[197352]: fatal: root(0): message file too big

To check the default attachments size settings of Postfix use the following command:

# postconf -d | grep size
berkeley_db_create_buffer_size = 16777216
berkeley_db_read_buffer_size = 131072
body_checks_size_limit = 51200
bounce_size_limit = 50000
header_size_limit = 102400
mailbox_size_limit = 51200000
message_size_limit = 10240000
tcp_windowsize = 0

As you can see the Postfix default value for a mailbox size is 51200000 bytes and max message size is 10240000 bytes.
To fix this issue the maximum outgoing message size needs to be increased as well as the mailbox size.
By entering the following commands we will set unlimited for both, mailbox size and max message size:

postconf -e mailbox_size_limit=0 Continue Reading...

If you want to monitor your Nginx server status and all connections per second just like Apache mod_status unde Debian or any Linux/Unix distribution follow this tutorial.

By default, Nginx web server comes with a module called  HttpStubStatusModule that provides information on Nginx active connections, connections per second and other.

This tutorial will show you how to enable this feature in Debian Squeeze:

1. Configure Ngins Status:

First, open the nginx.conf file. On Debian, this is located under the /etc/nginx directory.

# vi nginx.conf

Then add the followings in context location or under every virtualhost that you have configured:

location /nginx_status {
#This turn on stats
stub_status on;
access_log off;
#You can allow only from your home IP address or from any location
allow 192.168.1.100; #Let's day that this is your IP
#Uncomment the next line if you want to allow access to this from anywhere
#allow all;
deny all;
}

2. Save and close the file and reload nginx server:

/etc/init.d/nginx restart
[ ok ] Restarting nginx: nginx.

OR Continue Reading…

When you are browsing a website, you can check the type of web server running by retrieving the response server header. For example the following server response return for website http://www.debian-tutorials.com:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Server: Apache/2.2.22
Date: Mon, 04 Mar 2013 00:43:59 GMT
Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8
Connection: keep-alive
X-Powered-By: PHP/5.2.17
X-Pingback: http://www.debian-tutorials.com/xmlrpc.php
Cache-Control: max-age=7200
Expires: Mon, 04 Mar 2013 02:43:58 GMT
Vary: Accept-Encoding

From the information we can know that the web server is running on Apache version 2.2.22.

By using NginX you can personalize and customize your server header to the name that you want. Instead of showing the real web server name which is “nginx“  you can set for users to see the web server name as “my websites webserver“.

In this guide I will show you how to  customize server header using NginX headers-more module without compiling again the server.

1. Install Nginx webserver if you don’t have it installed already.

You can use this guide to do it: Setting up Nginx plus PHP FastCGI on Debian 6.0.6 Squeeze

2.Install nginx-extras package.

In Debian Squeeze exists one package called nginx-extras that contains some standard modules, plus extra features and modules like headers-more-module and others. You can find more info here: http://packages.debian.org/sid/nginx-extras

Install the nginx-extras packages like this:

apt-get install nginx-extras

3. Make some changes under  http directive to NginX configuration file which located under /etc/nginx/nginx.conf as below: Continue Reading…

Nagios is a free service monitoring system, that enables organizations to identify and resolve IT infrastructure problems before they affect critical business processes.
In this tutorial I will show you how to install Nagios on Debian 6. For this, I will use a fresh installed Debian 6 with minimalistic packages.

Step1. Install Nagios packages:

By default, Nagios packages are already included in Debian 6 main repository. To install them run this command:

root@nagios:/# apt-get install nagios*

This command will install all packages needed by nagios to work properly.

nagios-install

Step2. Now you will be presented with the question that you need to fill in the information required:

You will be asked first to enter the password for Admin. Choose a strong password and confirm it.

nagio-password

NOTE: This is the username and password you will use to log in to your nagios  installation after configuration is complete. Continue Reading...

Today was released the first RC for Debian 7.0 aka Wheezy.

Improvements in this release of the installer

  • brltty:
    • Fix support for the theme=dark accessibility option (#696972).
    • Enable orca in gnome3 sessions too.

    Please note: the gdm3 prompt isn’t accessible (#694937).

  • cdebconf:
    • Fix display of info messages (e.g. Rescue mode in the banner).
    • Improve speech synthesis support.
  • debconf: Fix misleading man-db title for GRUB prompt (#679327).
  • debian-cd:
    • Improve GRUB menus used when booting in UEFI mode so they match up better with the equivalent syslinux menus.
    • Change the default UEFI display resolution to 800×600 for maximum compatibility.
    • Fix README.html generation (#699198).
  • debian-installer-utils: Fix procfs mounting on GNU/kFreeBSD (#696901).
  • grub2:
    • Improve support for EFI installs: make sure /boot/grub exists, and copy unicode.pf2 there (#696962, #661789).
    • Fix infinite recursion in gettext when translation fails (#611537 and many others).
  • lowmem: Adjust lowmem limit for GNU/kFreeBSD needed for ZFS volumes (#696786).
  • mountmedia:
    • Revert kernel bug workaround (#694082).
    • Firmware loading issues should disappear accordingly.
  • netcfg: Write network-manager configuration (included wireless settings when applicable) if it’s found in the installed system; configure ifupdown for wired networking otherwise (#682608).
  • oldsys-preseed:
    • Ignore a missing gateway with DHCP (#687212).
    • Use netcfg/disable_autoconfig instead of netcfg/disable_dhcp (#689531).
  • preseed: Deal with URLs that consist of an unqualified machine name and a port (#695908).
  • qcontrol: Disable firmware watchdog on TS-219p II and TS-419p II (#693263).
  • rootskel: Use the same keymap in the virtual consoles as the one selected in the graphical installer (#606395).
  • xorg-server: Avoid cursor jumps in VirtualBox (#694598).

Hardware support changes

  • linux: Add many drivers to the installer: 8021q, adm8211, at76c50x-usb, b43legacy, bnx2fc, cxgb4, cxgb4vf, fnic, igbvf, int51x1, isci, iwl4965, ixgbevf, libertas_tf_usb, micrel, mlx4_en, mwifiex_pcie, mwl8k, orinoco_usb, pata_piccolo, pch_gbe, pmcraid, prism2_usb, qlge, r8187se, r8192e_pci, r8712u, rtl8192ce, rtl8192cu, rtl8192de, rtl8192se, smsc75xx, smsc9420, smsc95xx, tehuti, ums-eneub6250, ums-realtek, vt6656_stage, vxge (#686605, #689159, #690886, #694348, #695437).
  • linux: Add Ralink wifi device IDs: 5362, 5392, 539b (#694312).
  • linux: Add support for Lenovo 10/100 Ethernet USB dongle (#696248).

You can find more info on http://www.debian.org website.

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