Everyone loves using services like Dropbox or Boxnet. Half of us do have hardware laying around that we’d love to convert into our own cloud server but never came across the right software.

In this tutorial i’ll show you how to create your own cloud server:

Step1. Install depencencies need for cloud server:

apt-get install apache2 php5 php5-sqlite php5-json

optional dependencies: apt-get install mp3info curl libcurl3 libcurl3-dev php5-curl zip

Step2. Download ownCloud from owncloud.org:

You can download it from here: http://gitorious.org/owncloud/owncloud/archive-tarball/master

or from repository: git clone git://gitorious.org/owncloud/owncloud.git

Step3. Extract the archive using tar and copy the content to /var/www:

Continue Reading…

Step1. Squid3 install.

apt-get install squid3

Step2. Rename the original squid.conf for backup:

mv /etc/squid3/squid.conf /etc/squid3/squid.conf.back

Step3. Create a new custom file squid.conf:

nano /etc/squid3/squid.conf

and paste the following content:

http_port 3128 transparent
acl localhost src 127.0.0.0/8
http_access allow localhost
cache_dir ufs /var/spool/squid3 7000 16 256
auth_param basic program /usr/lib/squid3/squid_db_auth --user userproxy --password parolaproxi --plaintext --persist
auth_param basic children 5
auth_param basic realm This is a welcome message that will me displayed to each user.
auth_param basic credentialsttl 1 minute
auth_param basic casesensitive off
acl db-auth proxy_auth REQUIRED
http_access allow db-auth
http_access allow localhost
http_access deny all

Step4. We will go now to the MySQL and create the database: Continue Reading…

There are several methods to move Linux to another hard disk on the same server.
But I used Unix dump / restore utility to do this …

Step1. First you need a new hard disk partition in the same way as with previous unit (Linux is running on). I usually use the utility ‘fdisk‘.
Let us suppose that the old drive is /dev/sda and a new one is /dev/sdb.
To view the partition table hda please run ‘fdisk-l  /dev/ sda “which should show something like this:

root@deb:~# fdisk -l /dev/sda

Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80026361856 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9729 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x0007384e

Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           1        9330    74936320   83  Linux
/dev/sda2            9330        9730     3212289    5  Extended
/dev/sda5            9330        9730     3212288   82  Linux swap

Step2. After this run ‘fdisk /dev/sdb’ and make the same partitions at it. Interactive mode of fdisk utility is well documented and is very intuitive, so I don’t think it would be difficult to perform partitioning.

After this is done, we should make new filesystems at partitions we’ve created:

mkfs -t ext3 /dev/sdb1
mkswap /dev/sdb2

Step3. Now new hard drive preparation is finished and we can proceed with moving Linux to it. Mount new filesystem and change directory to it:

mount /dev/hdb1 /mnt/hdb1
cd /mnt/hdb1

Step4.  Perform moving by command:

dump -0uan -f – / | restore -r -f

When dump/restore procedures are done we should install boot loader to new HDD. Run ‘grub’ utility and execute in it’s console:

root (hd1, 0)
setup (hd1)
quit

Enjoy.

Show Disk Usage with NCDU

Valic —  October 14, 2011 — 1 Comment

NCDU is a disk usage analyzer with an ncurses interface, aimed to be run on a remote server where you don’t have an entire gaphical setup, but have to do with a simple SSH connection.

ncdu aims to be fast, simple and easy to use, and should be able to run in any minimal POSIX-like environment with ncurses installed.

Installation:

[php]apt-get </code><code>install</code> <code>ncdu[/php]

Issuing ncdu inside the folder that you want to check will open a cool ncurses interface, really easy to use.

ncdu usage:

  •   -h                         This help message
  •   -q                         Quiet mode, refresh interval 2 seconds
  •   -v                         Print version
  •   -x                         Same filesystem
  •   –exclude PATTERN          Exclude files that match PATTERN
  •   -X, –exclude-from FILE    Exclude files that match any pattern in FILE

Screenshots:

Continue Reading…

Pico explicit command list

Valic —  September 22, 2011 — Leave a comment

Pico is an easy-to-use text editor on the CNS Logon Server that is designed to work in tandem with Pine e-mail. It can also be used with the Tin news reader and can be set as the default text editor for your Logon Server account.
You can start Pico two ways:

  • by activating the Pico hypertext link, under the Lynx menu called “Basic Services”
  • by typing in pico filename at the UNIX system prompt. Unlike many UNIX file editors, which require memorizing and typing a lot of commands on a command line, Pico works with key combinations based on the Control key (Ctrl).

Pico commands are usually given using the control <CTRL> keys. The most common commands appear in a menu at the bottom of the screen during a pico session. The menus are context sensitive and will vary depending on what you are doing within pico.

Pico Commands:


  • Ctrl-G  Get Help
  • Ctrl-X   Exit Pico saving buffer to specified filename
  • Ctrl-O  Write Out buffer into a file saving it and remaining in Pico

Moving around Pico:


Continue Reading…

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