Step1. Squid3 install.

apt-get install squid3

Step2. Rename the original squid.conf for backup:

mv /etc/squid3/squid.conf /etc/squid3/squid.conf.back

Step3. Create a new custom file squid.conf:

nano /etc/squid3/squid.conf

and paste the following content:

http_port 3128 transparent
acl localhost src 127.0.0.0/8
http_access allow localhost
cache_dir ufs /var/spool/squid3 7000 16 256
auth_param basic program /usr/lib/squid3/squid_db_auth --user userproxy --password parolaproxi --plaintext --persist
auth_param basic children 5
auth_param basic realm This is a welcome message that will me displayed to each user.
auth_param basic credentialsttl 1 minute
auth_param basic casesensitive off
acl db-auth proxy_auth REQUIRED
http_access allow db-auth
http_access allow localhost
http_access deny all

Step4. We will go now to the MySQL and create the database: Continue Reading…

There are several methods to move Linux to another hard disk on the same server.
But I used Unix dump / restore utility to do this …

Step1. First you need a new hard disk partition in the same way as with previous unit (Linux is running on). I usually use the utility ‘fdisk‘.
Let us suppose that the old drive is /dev/sda and a new one is /dev/sdb.
To view the partition table hda please run ‘fdisk-l  /dev/ sda “which should show something like this:

[email protected]:~# fdisk -l /dev/sda

Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80026361856 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9729 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x0007384e

Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           1        9330    74936320   83  Linux
/dev/sda2            9330        9730     3212289    5  Extended
/dev/sda5            9330        9730     3212288   82  Linux swap

Step2. After this run ‘fdisk /dev/sdb’ and make the same partitions at it. Interactive mode of fdisk utility is well documented and is very intuitive, so I don’t think it would be difficult to perform partitioning.

After this is done, we should make new filesystems at partitions we’ve created:

mkfs -t ext3 /dev/sdb1
mkswap /dev/sdb2

Step3. Now new hard drive preparation is finished and we can proceed with moving Linux to it. Mount new filesystem and change directory to it:

mount /dev/hdb1 /mnt/hdb1
cd /mnt/hdb1

Step4.  Perform moving by command:

dump -0uan -f – / | restore -r -f

When dump/restore procedures are done we should install boot loader to new HDD. Run ‘grub’ utility and execute in it’s console:

root (hd1, 0)
setup (hd1)
quit

Enjoy.

Show Disk Usage with NCDU

Valic —  October 14, 2011 — 1 Comment

NCDU is a disk usage analyzer with an ncurses interface, aimed to be run on a remote server where you don’t have an entire gaphical setup, but have to do with a simple SSH connection.

ncdu aims to be fast, simple and easy to use, and should be able to run in any minimal POSIX-like environment with ncurses installed.

Installation:

[php]apt-get </code><code>install</code> <code>ncdu[/php]

Issuing ncdu inside the folder that you want to check will open a cool ncurses interface, really easy to use.

ncdu usage:

  •   -h                         This help message
  •   -q                         Quiet mode, refresh interval 2 seconds
  •   -v                         Print version
  •   -x                         Same filesystem
  •   –exclude PATTERN          Exclude files that match PATTERN
  •   -X, –exclude-from FILE    Exclude files that match any pattern in FILE

Screenshots:

Continue Reading…

Pico explicit command list

Valic —  September 22, 2011 — Leave a comment

Pico is an easy-to-use text editor on the CNS Logon Server that is designed to work in tandem with Pine e-mail. It can also be used with the Tin news reader and can be set as the default text editor for your Logon Server account.
You can start Pico two ways:

  • by activating the Pico hypertext link, under the Lynx menu called “Basic Services”
  • by typing in pico filename at the UNIX system prompt. Unlike many UNIX file editors, which require memorizing and typing a lot of commands on a command line, Pico works with key combinations based on the Control key (Ctrl).

Pico commands are usually given using the control <CTRL> keys. The most common commands appear in a menu at the bottom of the screen during a pico session. The menus are context sensitive and will vary depending on what you are doing within pico.

Pico Commands:


  • Ctrl-G  Get Help
  • Ctrl-X   Exit Pico saving buffer to specified filename
  • Ctrl-O  Write Out buffer into a file saving it and remaining in Pico

Moving around Pico:


Continue Reading…

In this post i will show you what steps  I followed to adapt RAID1 on an existing installation of Debian Squeeze.

Step1. Make sure you have the following packages are installed:

apt-get update && apt-get upgrade
apt-get install mdadm rsync initramfs-tools grub-pc

Step2.  Partitioning the new drive:

First connect the new drive (/dev/sdb) and boot into your sistem.
Then use fdisk to display the partition informations for the existing drive (/dev/sda).

[email protected]:~# fdisk -l /dev/sda

Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80026361856 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9729 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x0007384e

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 1 9330 74936320 83 Linux
/dev/sda2 9330 9730 3212289 5 Extended
/dev/sda5 9330 9730 3212288 82 Linux swap / Solaris

Now create partitions of the same size on the new drive.

NOTE:If the new drive is bigger leave the rest of the drive unpartitioned.

Step3. Create new degraded RAID1 arrays:

Continue Reading…

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