If you want to use windows 8 with Linux here is the solution.

If the Grub loader is not loading after windows 8 install, first you need to boot with a Live CD.

Then run these commands as root:

To find the drive where Linux is installed run the following command:

fdisk -l

Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           1        9330    74936320   83  Linux

In my case sda1 is the drive where Linux is installed.
Then you need to run the following commands:

mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/
mount -o bind /dev /mnt/dev
mount -o bind /proc /mnt/proc
cp /proc/mounts /mnt/etc/mtab/
chroot /mnt /bin/bash
grub-install /dev/sda Continue Reading...

Few days ago I typed crontab -r instead of crontab -e. Well, my crontab was immediately deleted, without any warning. The first thing that I’ve done was to check if there was some backups on the server. As usual, there was no backups on my server.

So..If you accidentally type crontab -r instead of crontab -e , I have the solution for you:

In the system logs /var/logs/ are stored all crontab-calls of your system and you can easily extract them. Depending on your system you need to  cat and grep all crontab lines from the /var/log/syslog* files like this:

cat /var/log/syslog | grep -i "`which cron`" > cron_recovery_file

`which cron` will automatically be replaced by /usr/sbin/cron on Debian.

You need also extract all data from older messages logs stored as .gz archives:

gzip -d /var/log/syslog*.gz -c | grep -i "`which cron`" >> cron_recovery_file

In this moment you have a file called cron_recovery_file  that contains all your crontab-calls.

Your file will look like this now:

Feb 12 19:00:01 debian-tutorials /USR/SBIN/CRON[53198]: (root) CMD (crontab_command > /dev/null 2>&1)
Feb 12 19:00:01 debian-tutorials /USR/SBIN/CRON[53199]: (root) CMD (/scripts/backups > /dev/null 2>&1)
Feb 12 19:00:01 debian-tutorials /USR/SBIN/CRON[53200]: (root) CMD (mysql -u root --password=************ -e "flush query cache"; > /dev/null 2>&1)
Feb 12 19:09:01 debian-tutorials /USR/SBIN/CRON[53277]: (root) CMD (  [ -x /usr/lib/php5/maxlifetime ] && [ -d /var/lib/php5 ] && find /var/lib/php5/ -type f -cmin +$(/usr/lib/php5/maxlifetime) -print0 | xargs -n 200 -r -0 rm)
Feb 12 19:17:01 debian-tutorials /USR/SBIN/CRON[53288]: (root) CMD (   cd / && run-parts --report /etc/cron.hourly)
Feb 12 19:30:01 debian-tutorials /USR/SBIN/CRON[53293]: (root) CMD (another_crontab_command > /dev/null 2>&1)

Now, you need to start with the first line and copy/paste the call ( denotes the stuff in the brackets after ‘CMD’) to a new textfile which will be your new crontab. Continue Reading…

In this article I will show you some MySQL commands with examples.

1. MySQL Set Root Password

You can set the mysql root password from command line like this:

mysqladmin -u root password your_password

You can also change mysql root password if you forgot it using this tutorial: How to Recover MySQL Root Password

2. Change MySQL Users Passwords from the command line

mysqladmin -u mysql_username -h mysql_host -p password 'new_mysql_password'

3. How To Connect to Local MySQL Server

This is how you connect to your local MySQL server from the command line:

mysql -u root -p

4. Create a MySQL Database

The following command will create a new MySQL database after you are connected:

create database debiantutorials_db;

5. Backup MySQL Database with mysqldump

Backup a database to a .sql file:

mysqldump -u root -p debiantutorials_db > debiantutorials_db.sql

You can also compress the database with gzip on the fly while you are dumping:

mysqldump -u root -p debiantutorials_db | gzip -v > debiantutorials_db.sql.gz

6. Mysqldump and Skip Table

You want to dump a mysql database with one or more crashed tables and you get an error like this? Continue Reading…

This script will send you an email that contains all cron jobs for all your users.

#!/bin/bash
# Show all users cron jobs and send a report via email
# Created by [email protected], no rights reserved.
# Please submit feedback and questions at [email protected]
# Homepage: http://www.debian-tutorials.com

EMAIL=$1
if [ -n "$EMAIL" ] ; then
	TMPFILE=/tmp/cronjobs.tmp.$$

        #get all users list
	for i in `cat /etc/passwd | cut -f1 -d :`; do
		echo "##################################################"
		echo "Username: ${i}"
		echo "##################################################"
		crontab -u ${i} -l 2>&1
		echo "##################################################"
	done > $TMPFILE
	cat $TMPFILE | mail -s "Cronjobs report for `hostname`" ${EMAIL}
	rm -f $TMPFILE
else
	echo "Usage: ./cronlist your_email_address"
	exit
fi

You can download this script directly from here: How to show cron jobs for all users

When you will start using the Bash shell more often, you will appreciate these shortcuts that can save you very much typing time:

Shortcut Description

Up/Down Arrow Keys

You can scroll back to an old command, hit ENTER, and execute the command without having to re-type it.

history command

Show your complete command history.

TAB Completion

If you type a partial command or filename that the shell recognizes, you can have it automatically completed for you if you press the TAB key.
Search your command history with

CTRL-R

Press CTRL-R and then type any portion of a recent command. It will search the commands for you, and once you find the command you want, just press ENTER.
Scrolling the screen with Shift- PageUpandPage Down Scroll back and forward through your terminal.

CTRL + P

Does the same as the up arrow
CTRL + N Does the same as the down arrow

CTRL + G

Terminates the search function (escape does the same thing)
CTRL+ S Searchs forward in the command history.
CTRL + A Move cursor to start of line
CTRL+ E Move cursor to end of line
CTRL +B move backward within a line
CTRL + F move forward within a line
CTRL +D deletes characters and moves down the line
CTRL + K deletes the entire line
CTRL + X + backspace deletes all characters from cursors current position back
CTRL + T transpose text moves character down the li
ESC then c will convert the letter above the cursor to upper case
history –c will clear all of your history. Good for if your trying to hide command line passwords enetered.