There is a better, quicker way to do this which is to clone your entire drive onto a new drive.

You can do this with a tool like GParted, but there is also a command line tool that will get the job done as well. This tool is ddrescue. Now with ddrescue you will have to have your new disc partitioned (it will not partition for you). In this article I am going to show you how to get your dying Linux drive cloned onto a new drive.

Installation of ddrescue:

apt-get install ddrescue gparted

Paritioning your new drive:

After you installed the new drive reboot your server. Then do the following:

  1. Start GParted.
  2. Create a partition scheme on the new drive  identical with the old drive.
  3. Save the new partition scheme and you are ready to clone.

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KDE Community Ships First Translation and Service Release of the 4.5 Series

August 31st, 2010. Today, KDE has released a series of updates to the Plasma Desktop and Netbook workspaces, the KDE Applications and the KDE Platform. This update is the first in a series of stabilization updates to 4.5.0, coming every month, as if delivered by a cronjob. 4.5.1 brings bugfixes and translation updates on top of KDE SC 4.5.0. KDE SC 4.5.1 is a recommended update for everyone running KDE SC 4.5.0 or earlier versions. As the release only contains bugfixes and translation updates, it will be a safe and pleasant update for everyone. KDE SC 4 is already translated into more than 55 languages, with more to come.

To download source code or packages to install go to the KDE SC 4.5.1 Info Page.

KDE SC 4.5.1 brings a number of improvements:

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Just shy of a month ago was when NVIDIA last released a proprietary Linux driver, at which point they also released a second driver that was their OpenGL 4.1 preview driver. This Saturday though NVIDIA has provided a new driver release, which is tagged as the 256.52 pre-release. This new Linux driver release isn’t overly exciting, but it does carry some prominent fixes that will please some NVIDIA customers.

The NVIDIA Linux 256.52 driver does not provide OpenGL 4.1 support, does not provide OpenCL 1.1 support (their early OpenCL 1.1 Linux drivers available to developers are in the 258.xx release stream), and does not offer CoolBits overclocking for GeForce GTX 400 series “Fermi” hardware.

What this driver update though does provide is a fix that previously prevented XvMC (X-Video Motion Compensation) from initializing (but if there’s anyone still using XvMC in NVIDIA’s binary driver, you should really update your application and driver to utilize the much superior VDPAU API), support for the xorg-server 8 video ABI used by X.Org Server 1.9, a bug that caused extremely slow OpenGL rendering when on X screens other than screen zero when a compositing manager was in use, stability problems on select GPUs such as the GeForce GT 240, a slow kernel virtual address space leak with OpenGL/CUDA/VDPAU applications, and lastly is a bug-fix for hangs when using two or more VDPAU applications simultaneously.

The NVIDIA 256.52 pre-release driver for Linux x86/x86_64 platforms can be downloaded at NvNews.net. If you missed it, earlier this week we delivered our first NVIDIA “Fermi” Linux benchmarks in this NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 review.

What’s not always appreciated, is just how significant a portion of the market Linux servers are getting to be.
Whereas unit shipments of Windows servers increased 28.2 percent year over year in the second quarter of 2010, Linux server revenue grew 30.0 percent to $1.8 billion when compared with the second quarter of 2009.
Linux servers now represent 16.8 percent of all server revenue, up 2.5 points over 2009.

Linux is eminently better suited to server use than Windows. Why ? Let’s see:

1. Stability

Linux systems are well known for their ability to run for years without failure; in fact, many Linux users have never seen a crash. That’s great for users of every kind, but it’s particularly valuable for small and medium-sized businesses, for which downtime can have disastrous consequences.

Linux also handles a large number of processes running at once much better than Windows does–that’s something, in fact, that tends to degrade Windows’ stability quickly.

Then there’s the need for rebooting. Whereas in Windows configuration changes typically require a reboot–causing inevitable downtime–there’s generally no need to restart Linux. Almost all Linux configuration changes can be done while the system is running and without affecting unrelated services.

Similarly, whereas Windows servers must often be defragmented frequently, that’s all but eliminated on Linux. Let your competitors endure the plentiful downtime that inevitably goes hand-in-hand with Windows; trusty Linux will keep you up and running and serving your customers around the clock.

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OpenSSH 5.6 released

Valic —  August 30, 2010 — Leave a comment

OpenSSH 5.6 has just been released. It will be available from the mirrors listed at http://www.openssh.com/ shortly.

Features:

* Added a ControlPersist option to ssh_config(5) that automatically starts a background ssh(1) multiplex master when connecting. This connection can stay alive indefinitely, or can be set to automatically close after a user-specified duration of inactivity.

* Hostbased authentication may now use certificate host keys. CA keys must be specified in a known_hosts file using the @cert-authority marker as described in sshd(8).

* ssh-keygen(1) now supports signing certificate using a CA key that has been stored in a PKCS#11 token.

* ssh(1) will now log the hostname and address that we connected to at LogLevel=verbose after authentication is successful to mitigate “phishing” attacks by servers with trusted keys that accept authentication silently and automatically before presenting fake password/passphrase prompts.

Note that, for such an attack to be successful, the user must have disabled StrictHostKeyChecking (enabled by default) or an attacker must have access to a trusted host key for the destination server.

* Expand %h to the hostname in ssh_config Hostname options. While this sounds useless, it is actually handy for working with unqualified

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